Author - nigel.lokan

1
Australian High Court Rules Rosuvastatin Low Dose Patent Obvious
2
Is Australia’s Innovation Patent System on Borrowed Time?
3
Extension of Term for Australian Patents Relating to AbbVie’s Blockbuster Drug HUMIRA Denied
4
Single Patent Filing and Examination in Australia and New Zealand Almost a Reality
5
Flying Doughnuts – Future Reality?
6
High Court Confirms That Extension of Time Provisions Apply to Requests for Pharmaceutical Extensions of Term
7
Restrictions to Filing Divisional Applications Under New Zealand’s New Patent Law
8
Further Amendments to Australian Patent Law Coming Soon
9
Australian Patent Examination Reports Issuing Faster Than Expected in Some Technology Areas
10
Are you Ready for Commencement of New Zealand’s New Patents Act?

Australian High Court Rules Rosuvastatin Low Dose Patent Obvious

In an eagerly awaited decision¹ the Australian High Court has upheld a decision of a five judge bench of the Full Federal Court that AstraZeneca’s patent relating to low dosages of rosuvastatin is invalid on the basis that the claims lack an inventive step.

Section 7(3) of the Patents Act 1990 (Act) as it existed at the priority date of Astra Zeneca’s patent imposed a threshold requirement that in order to be considered for assessing inventive step a document must be “ascertained, understood and regarded as relevant” by a person skilled in the art.

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Is Australia’s Innovation Patent System on Borrowed Time?

On 5 August 2015, the Australian Patent Office (IP Australia) released a consultation paper seeking feedback from interested stakeholders on the Advisory Council on Intellectual Property’s (ACIP) recommendation that the Australian Government should abolish the innovation patent system.

Introduced in 2001 under the Howard Government, the innovation patent system is Australia’s second tier patent right having a shorter term,eight  years, and a lower threshold of invention (i.e. an ‘innovative step’ as opposed to an ‘inventive step’ required for a standard patent).

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Extension of Term for Australian Patents Relating to AbbVie’s Blockbuster Drug HUMIRA Denied

In a recent decision the Australian Patent Office has rejected applications to extend the term of three patents related to the highly successful anti-inflammatory drug HUMIRA.

The patents are part of a family in which extensions of term had been granted in connection with earlier patents. These earlier extensions were based on the initial listing of HUMIRA on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Single Patent Filing and Examination in Australia and New Zealand Almost a Reality

As we reported late last year, the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2014 was read by the Australian House of Representatives. On 9 February 2015, the bill passed the Australia Senate and will soon become law in Australia as the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Act 2015.

One significant aspect of the new law is the introduction of a Single Application Process (SAP) and a Single Examination Process (SEP) for Australia and New Zealand patent applications. Read More

Flying Doughnuts – Future Reality?

Airbus filed a suite of patent applications recently, one of which includes a futuristic looking new concept for a passenger aircraft.

Dubbed the ‘flying doughnut’, and looking like a craft one would expect to see only in a science fiction movie, the aircraft features a circular cabin accessed via a cavity in the middle, contained in the middle of a giant triangular wing.

The aircraft design allows for a wider passenger cabin than traditional passenger aircrafts, with the circular cabin making the most of the greater width. An important advantage of this new aircraft is that the circular cabin is better able to withstand pressurisation loads without compromising cabin space.

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High Court Confirms That Extension of Time Provisions Apply to Requests for Pharmaceutical Extensions of Term

In a recent decision, the High Court of Australia has ruled that the extension of time provisions of the Australian Patents Act 1990 (Act) can be used to extend the time for requesting an extension of term of a patent relating to a pharmaceutical substance.

The dispute was based on a request by Lundbeck to extend the term of Australian patent 623144.  The extension of term request was filed after the applicable deadline and was, therefore, accompanied by an application for an extension of time.  Read More

Restrictions to Filing Divisional Applications Under New Zealand’s New Patent Law

The New Zealand Patents Regulations 2014 have effectively introduced a five year deadline for filing divisional applications.

The deadline arises as a result of restricting the period in which examination of a divisional application may be requested. In this regard, examination must be requested within five years of the date of filing of the parent application, or for a series of divisional applications, within five years of the date of filing of the first application in the series. Read More

Further Amendments to Australian Patent Law Coming Soon

Earlier this year, the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2014 (2014 Bill) was introduced into Parliament by the Coalition Government. The Bill represents a revised version of the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2013 (2013 Bill) introduced by the previous Labor Government. The 2013 Bill lapsed when the Federal Election was called in August 2013.

 The most significant aspects of the 2014 Bill are as follows: 

  • Introduction of a single patent attorney regulatory regime and a single patent application and examination process for Australia and New Zealand.
  • Enabling Australian pharmaceutical manufacturers to apply to the Federal Court for a compulsory licence to manufacture generic versions of patented drugs to supply to developing countries. Read More

Australian Patent Examination Reports Issuing Faster Than Expected in Some Technology Areas

Prior to commencement of the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment (Raising the Bar) Act 2012, which came into effect in April 2013, the Australian Patent Office was inundated with requests for examination from applicants wishing to have their applications examined under the current law.

This flood of examination requests led the Patent Office to last year advise that first examination reports would likely issue, on average, about 19 months after examination is requested. We have recently been advised by the Patent Office that the backlog of applications awaiting examination is starting to clear and that examination reports are now issuing, on average, about 16 months after examination is requested. Read More

Are you Ready for Commencement of New Zealand’s New Patents Act?

New Zealand patent law has been completely overhauled and modernised. Details of the changes can be found here. The new law commences on 13 September 2014, which is only two weeks away!

The new provisions raise the requirements for patentability and the requirements for patent specifications and bring New Zealand patent law into substantial conformity with the patent laws of other developed countries, such as Australia. Among the new provisions is a provision which denies patentability to alleged inventions where the contribution to the art lies solely in it being a computer program. Read More

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