Archive: June 14, 2016

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Italian Supreme Court on Secondary Meaning: When a Registered Generic Sign can Become a Trademark
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When a picture can be considered deceptively similar to a word

Italian Supreme Court on Secondary Meaning: When a Registered Generic Sign can Become a Trademark

On 19 April 2016, the Italian Supreme Court passed on secondary meaning, overruling two sets of proceedings of the courts of merits which declared the invalidity of a trademark.

The case arose some debate among professionals since the trademark declared invalid was registered by a very well-known bathroom tissue producer which invested substantial efforts for decades to ensure that its registered generic sign (“Rotoloni” which literally means big toilet roll) had acquired distinctiveness by way of secondary meaning.

As a result of its efforts, the defendant offered a public opinion survey evidencing that 51% of interviewed consumers were recognizing the generic sign at issue as distinctive of products coming from a specific company. Read More

When a picture can be considered deceptively similar to a word

The Trade Marks Office has taken a sword to the hopes of applicants wanting to register device trade marks which are perceived to match existing registered word marks in its decision on the SAMURAI WARRIOR (device) submitted for registration by Teraglow Pty Ltd.

IP Australia repeatedly rejected the SAMURAI WARRIOR mark at examination stage under s 44(1) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 (Cth), citing prior registered word mark SAMURAI, owned by Globeride Inc.

Read More

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