Tag: Amgen Inc.

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BPCIA: A “Choose Your Own Adventure” Statute?
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Amgen Prevails on Temporarily Excluding Zarxio® From Market
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Dancing Not Required: District Court Denies Amgen’s Bid for Preliminary Injunction, Finds BPCIA “Patent Dance” Optional
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FDA Accepts First Biosimilar Application Filed Under Section 351(K) of the Public Health Services Act

BPCIA: A “Choose Your Own Adventure” Statute?

On June 3, 2015, the Federal Circuit heard oral argument on Amgen Inc.’s (“Amgen”) appeal of the Northern District of California’s decision holding that the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act’s (“BPCIA’s”) “patent dance” provisions are optional, and that the 180-day notice provision does not require licensure in Amgen, Inc., et al. v. Sandoz, Inc., et al., Case No. 14-cv-04741-RS (N.D. Cal. March 19, 2015).

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Amgen Prevails on Temporarily Excluding Zarxio® From Market

After an unsuccessful attempt to obtain a preliminary injunction against Sandoz Inc.’s (“Sandoz”) Zarxio® in the District Court for the Northern District of California, Amgen Inc. (“Amgen”) has prevailed before the Federal Circuit in excluding the biosimilar from the market, at least temporarily. On May 5, 2015, the Federal Circuit granted Amgen’s motion for an injunction “preventing Sandoz [ ] from marketing, selling, offering for sale, or importing into the United States its FDA-approved ZARXIO® biosimilar product until this Court resolves the appeal.” Amgen Inc. et al. v. Sandoz Inc. et al., Appeal No. 2015-1499, Dkt. 105 (Fed. Cir. March 27, 2015).

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Dancing Not Required: District Court Denies Amgen’s Bid for Preliminary Injunction, Finds BPCIA “Patent Dance” Optional

The biologics industry has been closely monitoring Amgen Inc.’s (“Amgen’s”) lawsuit against Sandoz Inc. (“Sandoz”) for refusing to engage in the BPCIA’s “patent dance” with respect to Sandoz’s application for Zarxio®, a biosimilar of Amgen’s Neupogen® (filgrastim), to see what, if any, guidance the district court would provide on the interpretation of the BPCIA. See Left without a Partner: Amgen Sues Sandoz for Refusing to Dance in Accordance with BPCIA Patent Procedures. This litigation has sparked additional interest in view of FDA’s recent approval of Zarxio®, which has led to industry-wide speculation regarding the litigation’s potential impact on Sandoz’s ability to market its now approved biosimilar. See FDA Approves First Biosimilar: Sandoz’s Zarxio®. The District Court of the Northern District of California has now provided an answer, siding with Sandoz’s interpretation that the BPCIA’s patent dance provisions are optional and the 180 day notice provision does not require licensure, and denying Amgen’s request for a preliminary injunction.

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FDA Accepts First Biosimilar Application Filed Under Section 351(K) of the Public Health Services Act

On 24 July 2014, over four years after the enactment of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act, the FDA accepted its first biosimilar application from Sandoz Inc. (Sandoz). Sandoz’s application is for a biosimilar version of Amgen Inc.’s (Amgen) Neupogen® (filgrastim). Neupogen® is a pharmaceutical analog of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor that is used to treat neutropenia, a condition where the body does not make enough neutrophils, a type of white blood cell. Amgen’s Neuprogen® is indicated for use by patients receiving strong chemotherapy to reduce their risk of infection.  Read More

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