Tag: Trademark

1
Can Trademarks Constituted by the Shape of a Product be Protected in the Jewelry Sector?
2
Vademecum on the Assessment of the Likelihood of Confusion Between Trademarks
3
When the Designer Using his Patronymic Infringes Third Parties’ Rights
4
Italian Supreme Court on Secondary Meaning: When a Registered Generic Sign can Become a Trademark

Can Trademarks Constituted by the Shape of a Product be Protected in the Jewelry Sector?

Cartier Wins Over the Request of Interim Relief by an Italian Company

Recently, an order of the court of Venice raised the matter of the shape of the product intended as a ground for refusal to registration and invalidity of a trademark.

The case is also interesting because it relates to the luxury sector and involved a leading firm in the jewelry sector, Cartier. An Italian jewelry producer, Fope S.r.l., sued Cartier alleging trademark counterfeiting and unfair competition for having marketed a jewelry collection reproducing a particular element of its icon product.  This iconic shape was previously registered as an Italian and European trademark. Cartier claimed the registered trademarks were invalid on the basis that they are composed by the shape giving a substantial value to the product and such circumstance represents a ground for refusal to registration by law.

Read More

Vademecum on the Assessment of the Likelihood of Confusion Between Trademarks

Italian Supreme Court Outlines Criteria to Conduct a Proper Likelihood of Confusion Test

On 27 May 2016, the Italian Supreme Court released a judgement recalling with clarity and completeness most of the consolidated principles concerning the assessment of the likelihood of confusion between trademarks. This judgement is to become a good instrument for professionals when addressing to the topic at issue as well as a reference for future decisions of the Courts of merit.

Read More

When the Designer Using his Patronymic Infringes Third Parties’ Rights

The Italian Supreme Court Finally Stated on the Long-Standing Fiorucci Case

On 25 May 2016, the Italian Supreme Court released an interesting decision on the use of patronymic as a trademark, which might have significant impact for many fashion and design firms which identify themselves with the name of their founders.

Edwin Co. Ltd., Edwin International and F. Design Office, which had previously acquired from Mr. Elio Fiorucci the ownership and the right of use of several trademarks containing the name ” Fiorucci”, filed an action against the designer because he was using and applying for registration of the trademark “Love Therapy by Elio Fiorucci” to identify a wide range of goods.

Read More

Italian Supreme Court on Secondary Meaning: When a Registered Generic Sign can Become a Trademark

On 19 April 2016, the Italian Supreme Court passed on secondary meaning, overruling two sets of proceedings of the courts of merits which declared the invalidity of a trademark.

The case arose some debate among professionals since the trademark declared invalid was registered by a very well-known bathroom tissue producer which invested substantial efforts for decades to ensure that its registered generic sign (“Rotoloni” which literally means big toilet roll) had acquired distinctiveness by way of secondary meaning.

As a result of its efforts, the defendant offered a public opinion survey evidencing that 51% of interviewed consumers were recognizing the generic sign at issue as distinctive of products coming from a specific company. Read More

Copyright © 2022, K&L Gates LLP. All Rights Reserved.