Tag: IP Australia

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Proposed Australian-New Zealand Single-Desk Patent System Abandoned
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IP Australia Announces New Official Fee Structure For Australian Trade Marks
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Single Patent Filing and Examination in Australia and New Zealand Almost a Reality
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Further Amendments to Australian Patent Law Coming Soon
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Limping Trade Marks and Distinctiveness in Australia
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Act Promptly and Diligently When Preparing Evidence in Patent Oppositions or Else…
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It’s Not Easy Being Green
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Dick Smith Loses OZEMITE Trade Mark – Appeal Pending!

Proposed Australian-New Zealand Single-Desk Patent System Abandoned

The proposed single application (SAP) and examination (SEP) processes for Australia and New Zealand have recently been abandoned, more than five years after they were first introduced. The SAP and SEP would have allowed applicants wishing to obtain patents in both countries to file a common application that would be examined by a single examiner at either IP Australia or IPONZ. Once accepted under each country’s law, two separate patents would be granted. Patent examiners would have had to learn to apply the laws of the other country.

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IP Australia Announces New Official Fee Structure For Australian Trade Marks

Australian Trade Mark Applications are Getting Cheaper

Following an extensive review of its fee structure, IP Australia has announced a revised official fee structure that is proposed to take effect from 12.00 am AEDT on 10 October 2016.

One of the key changes is that a registration fee will no longer be payable for Australian trade mark applications filed on, or after, 10 October 2016.  Under the existing regime, the usual filing fees for an Australian trade mark application were AUD200 per class, with AUD300 per class payable on registration.  Under the new regime, the usual filing fee will increase to AUD330 per class, but no further official fees will be payable.

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Single Patent Filing and Examination in Australia and New Zealand Almost a Reality

As we reported late last year, the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2014 was read by the Australian House of Representatives. On 9 February 2015, the bill passed the Australia Senate and will soon become law in Australia as the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Act 2015.

One significant aspect of the new law is the introduction of a Single Application Process (SAP) and a Single Examination Process (SEP) for Australia and New Zealand patent applications. Read More

Further Amendments to Australian Patent Law Coming Soon

Earlier this year, the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2014 (2014 Bill) was introduced into Parliament by the Coalition Government. The Bill represents a revised version of the Intellectual Property Laws Amendment Bill 2013 (2013 Bill) introduced by the previous Labor Government. The 2013 Bill lapsed when the Federal Election was called in August 2013.

 The most significant aspects of the 2014 Bill are as follows: 

  • Introduction of a single patent attorney regulatory regime and a single patent application and examination process for Australia and New Zealand.
  • Enabling Australian pharmaceutical manufacturers to apply to the Federal Court for a compulsory licence to manufacture generic versions of patented drugs to supply to developing countries. Read More

Limping Trade Marks and Distinctiveness in Australia

Oyster Bay’s Wine Bottle Trade Mark Application Rejected

In 2012, New Zealand winery Oyster Bay filed a trade mark application as follows:

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Act Promptly and Diligently When Preparing Evidence in Patent Oppositions or Else…

A recent decision of the Australian Patent Office has underscored the importance of acting promptly and diligently at all times when preparing evidence in patent oppositions.

In this case the patent applicant was unable to complete and serve its evidence-in-support and sought an extension of time in which to do so. The Commissioner’s delegate considered the conduct of the patent applicant throughout the period provided for service of the evidence and decided that the patent applicant had not acted promptly and diligently at all times. Read More

It’s Not Easy Being Green

BP’s Application for Registration of the Colour Green as a Trade Mark Rejected by IP Australia

IP Australia has again made it clear that the assessment of a colour trade mark under section 41 of the Trade Marks Act 1995 (Cth) should be no different from the assessment of any other trade mark. 

However in rejecting BP’s application for registration of the colour green, the Office noted that while most objects have to be some colour, the act of applying a colour to a product will not act as an identifier for that product. Read More

Dick Smith Loses OZEMITE Trade Mark – Appeal Pending!

Australian entrepreneur Dick Smith is famous for supporting Australian businesses that grow and produce products. One of the products he is associated with is ‘OZEMITE’, which was supposed to be a yeast based product similar to the Australian icon Vegemite (for our U.S. based readers, it is said that no Australian will travel anywhere in the world without a jar of Vegemite in their luggage – it is a national icon, like the kangaroo).   Read More

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