Tag: Office Decisions

1
The Scotch Whisky Saga: Where Name and Reputation is not enough
2
Supermac takes a bite out of McDonald’s as it loses the BIG MAC trade mark in the European Union
3
Round 1 of Australia’s CRISPR patent dispute concludes
4
New parallel importation laws in Australia
5
Federal Circuit holds that reissue application of hemodialysis shunt patent impermissibly recaptured surrendered subject matter
6
Thunder Road toasts success in “Pacific Ale” case again (Stone & Wood’s appeal dismissed)
7
Pushing the limits of Australia’s grace period
8
Australian Patent Office considers plausibility in a test for sufficiency
9
Louboutin Succeeds Again in Long Standing European Union Trade Mark Opposition Over Red Sole
10
European Union Trade Mark Law Reform – Revised Drafts Released

The Scotch Whisky Saga: Where Name and Reputation is not enough

William Grant & Sons, the distiller, blender and owner of Glenfiddich, the independent whisky company which markets itself as the “World’s Most Awarded Single Malt Scotch Whisky”, was unsuccessful in its recent opposition of Glenfield’s label trade mark application.

Back in 2018, Mumbai-based business man Vivek Anasane filed a trade mark application for the label of his ‘Glenfield’ Scotch whisky in an attempt to expand his drinks company into the UK. This was quickly opposed by William Grant & Sons who argued that the Glenfield mark was “visually and phonetically highly similar” to the Glenfiddich word mark.

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Supermac takes a bite out of McDonald’s as it loses the BIG MAC trade mark in the European Union

Although it may be one of the most famous burgers in the world, on 15 January 2019, Supermac’s (Holdings) Ltd was successful in seeking the cancellation of McDonald’s International Property Company Ltd (McDonald’s) EU trade mark registration for BIG MAC for burgers or restaurants.

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New parallel importation laws in Australia

Intellectual Property Laws Amendment (Productivity Commission Response Part 1 and Other Measures) Act 2018 receives Royal Assent on 24 August 2018

The proposed changes to parallel importation law that we blogged about in January 2018 and May 2018 have become law.

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Federal Circuit holds that reissue application of hemodialysis shunt patent impermissibly recaptured surrendered subject matter

The Federal Circuit, in a nonprecedential decision, held that claims of a reissue application were properly rejected because they recaptured subject matter surrendered during the original prosecution of U.S. Patent No. 8,282,591 (“the ’591 patent”).[1]

The ’591 patent is directed to an arteriovenous shunt that connects a graft to an artery and passes returned blood through a “single lumen venous outflow catheter” into the right atrium of a patient’s heart.  This system reduces the risk of infection, clotting, and hyperplasia compared to systems that remove and return blood through a graft connected to a vein.[2]

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Thunder Road toasts success in “Pacific Ale” case again (Stone & Wood’s appeal dismissed)

On 9 March 2018, Byron Bay brewery Stone & Wood lost an appeal in the Australian Full Federal Court of Appeal to Brunswick based brewer Thunder Road with respect to their respective uses of the word PACIFIC for their rival beers.

Stone & Wood sells craft beer, including its best-selling beer “Pacific Ale”. Thunder Road launched its “Thunder Road Pacific Ale” in 2015, which it renamed “Thunder Road Pacific” later that year following letters of demand from Stone & Wood.

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Pushing the limits of Australia’s grace period

Australia’s “grace period” provisions allow a patent applicant to disclose or use their invention within 12 months before filing a complete patent application in Australia.  In an interesting interpretation of those provisions, the Australian Patent Office has found that the grace period applies to whole of contents citations published after a patent application has been filed.

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Australian Patent Office considers plausibility in a test for sufficiency

The emergence of “plausibility” as a test for inventive step, sufficiency and industrial applicability represents a significant legal development in Europe in recent years.  Now the concept of plausibility has reached Australian shores, with the Australian Patent Office applying it in a test for sufficiency.

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Louboutin Succeeds Again in Long Standing European Union Trade Mark Opposition Over Red Sole

Christian Louboutin (Louboutin) has again been successful in a long running opposition proceeding filed by Roland SE (Roland) against its red sole trade mark in the European Union.

Louboutin has faced legal challenges around the world in registering and enforcing its signature red sole on its shoes.  In 2010, Louboutin filed a Community Trade Mark application for the below trade mark in class 25 for “high-heeled shoes (except orthopaedic footwear)” (Louboutin Mark):
shoe

 

(Louboutin Mark)

 

 

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European Union Trade Mark Law Reform – Revised Drafts Released

On 8 June 2015, the Council of the European Union published the final texts of its proposal to amend the Community Trade Mark Regulation (Regulation) and Trade Mark Directive (Directive).

The revised drafts reflect the key issues which have been the subject of significant debate in the last year, including:

  • harmonisation of trade mark law and practice between EU member states
  • measures to protect brand owners’ rights with respect to counterfeit goods in transit
  • cooperation between Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) and national trade mark offices
  • governance and finances of OHIM.

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