Tag: Trade mark

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Louis Vuitton Seeks Supreme Court Review to Resolve Purported Circuit Split on Trademark Dilution
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Say My Name: Beyoncé files trademarks for her newborn twins’ names
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Lack of distinctiveness as an obstacle for EUTM registration
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“Deluxe” as a word element of a trademark – ruling of the EU Court of Justice
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IP Australia Announces New Official Fee Structure For Australian Trade Marks
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ECJ Confirms that Brand Owners can Seek Remedies for IP Infringement Against Owners and Operators of Physical Marketplaces Selling Counterfeit Goods as “Intermediaries”
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When a picture can be considered deceptively similar to a word

Louis Vuitton Seeks Supreme Court Review to Resolve Purported Circuit Split on Trademark Dilution

Louis Vuitton recently petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to review a Second Circuit ruling that certain handbags are fair-use parodies of Louis Vuitton products, and therefore do not give rise to liability for trademark dilution by blurring. In its petition, Louis Vuitton contends there is a split of authority between the Second and Fourth Circuits regarding parody as a fair-use defense to dilution.

Louis Vuitton is the owner of famous trademarks “that immediately bring… to mind Louis Vuitton as the sole source of handbags and other stylish, high-quality goods bearing its marks.” My Other Bag, Inc. offers handbags with images of Louis Vuitton’s famous marks reproduced on one side, and the phrase “My other bag” inscribed on the back.

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Say My Name: Beyoncé files trademarks for her newborn twins’ names

Long gone are the days where the first registration of your child’s name was on their birth certificate.  On 26 June 2017, U.S. Trade Mark Application Numbers 87506186 and 87506188 were filed for the names of Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Shawn ‘Jay-Z’ Carter’s newborn twins ‘Rumi Carter’ and ‘Sir Carter’ by Beyoncé’s holding company, BGK Trademark Holdings.

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Lack of distinctiveness as an obstacle for EUTM registration

The distinctiveness of a trademark is one of the conditions for obtaining a European Union trade mark (EUTM) registration. The concept of a trademark is defined through the prism of distinctiveness as its inherent characteristic, and also its basic function. This distinctiveness may be inherent (due to the unprecedented and extraordinary structure or content of the sign) or acquired (as a result of use of the sign on the market). Distinctiveness should be possessed by each representable and sensory perceptible sign capable of distinguishing goods or services that should perform the functions of a trademark in business or trade.

To read the full alert, click here.

By: Michał Ziółkowski

IP Australia Announces New Official Fee Structure For Australian Trade Marks

Australian Trade Mark Applications are Getting Cheaper

Following an extensive review of its fee structure, IP Australia has announced a revised official fee structure that is proposed to take effect from 12.00 am AEDT on 10 October 2016.

One of the key changes is that a registration fee will no longer be payable for Australian trade mark applications filed on, or after, 10 October 2016.  Under the existing regime, the usual filing fees for an Australian trade mark application were AUD200 per class, with AUD300 per class payable on registration.  Under the new regime, the usual filing fee will increase to AUD330 per class, but no further official fees will be payable.

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ECJ Confirms that Brand Owners can Seek Remedies for IP Infringement Against Owners and Operators of Physical Marketplaces Selling Counterfeit Goods as “Intermediaries”

On 7 July 2016, the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) announced its judgment in case C-494/15, Tommy Hilfiger Licensing LLC and Others v Delta Center a.s.

The case concerned claims for trade mark infringement against Delta Center, the tenant of the “Prague market halls” marketplace, which rented sales spaces to sellers of counterfeit goods. Tommy Hilfiger and other trade mark owners brought an action before the Czech courts seeking an injunction under Article 11 of Directive 2004/48/EC, which states that: “Member States shall also ensure that rightholders are in a position to apply for an injunction against intermediaries whose services are used by a third party to infringe an intellectual property right, without prejudice to Article 8(3) of Directive 2001/29/EC”.

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When a picture can be considered deceptively similar to a word

The Trade Marks Office has taken a sword to the hopes of applicants wanting to register device trade marks which are perceived to match existing registered word marks in its decision on the SAMURAI WARRIOR (device) submitted for registration by Teraglow Pty Ltd.

IP Australia repeatedly rejected the SAMURAI WARRIOR mark at examination stage under s 44(1) of the Trade Marks Act 1995 (Cth), citing prior registered word mark SAMURAI, owned by Globeride Inc.

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